Frequently Asked Questions - Campus Conversations July 31, 2020

How many current students have decided not to register for classes this fall? How much income has been lost because of this?

We will not have final fall enrollment numbers until October. Once we do we will be able to assess the impact on the budget.

What is the percentage athletics staff who have taken the voluntary 10% salary cuts?

The director of athletics, the department’s highest-paid coaches have agreed to voluntary salary cuts for 2020-21. The UC Office of the President has not yet provided guidance on personnel actions for career staff.

What consideration is being given to reworking the athletics budget to help meet the budget shortfall?

Given the questions of the safety and viability of athletics in the fall; what consideration is being given to reworking the athletics budget (deferrable maintenance, temporarily cutting coaching staff salaries, etc.) to help meet the budget shortfall?

Just like every department and the campus as a whole, Cal Athletics is not immune to the effects of the pandemic. Since March, department leadership has modeled different scenarios and is forecasting as much as a $50-55 million impact on its budget if fall sports do not compete at all this year. The impact could be reduced considerably if football and other sports return in the spring. The athletic department’s plan to meet its budget objectives include adhering to a campus-wide hiring and merit-pay freeze; voluntary pay reductions for the athletic director, its highest-paid coaches; cutbacks of operations and administrative budgets by at least 10%; and consideration of a low-interest loan to help close any remaining budget gap after other budget-mitigating steps are put into place. The intent is not to make permanent changes because of an anticipation of a return to normal operations within 12-18 months.

Our football program costs millions of dollars, yet brings in no money. Seems like something we can easily cut.

That is actually not correct. Football produces significant net revenue, from television rights, ticket sales, merchandising, concessions, contributions, and sponsorships. In addition, football games provide opportunities for thousands of students, alumni, and the entire Cal community to come together for a common purpose and gather on Saturdays in the fall. With a nearly 140-history, football is truly a part of the fabric of our university and gamedays are opportunities to celebrate the entire campus.

What is the cost of running athletics programs?

Seems like that would be a major expense.

IA supports its 30 teams and 850 student-athletes with an annual budget of approximately $100 million. It supports its budget through media rights (i.e. television), ticket sales, philanthropic contributions, endowment income, and sponsorships, among other revenue streams. The department and the campus reached a six-year budget agreement in 2019, which provides for a dramatic reduction of institutional support through 2025. In order to be transparent, the plan has been shared with the Chancellor’s Cabinet and DIVCO. Chancellor Christ explained her perspective in a recent column that appeared in the 2019-20 winter edition of California Magazine. The athletic department met its budget target for the 2020 fiscal year despite the cancellation of spring sports in mid-March through a strict management of its expenses.

What is the "New Student Programming Fee"?

What is the "New Student Programming Fee" which has appeared in the last few days but not mentioned in the fee schedule?

You can review a full listing of fees at https://registrar.berkeley.edu/tuition-fees-residency/tuition-fees.

The New Student Programming Fee is not new and is charged every year - in fact, we are happy to report that this year it was lowered from $475 to $380.  This fee covers expenses related to Golden Bear Advising, Golden Bear Prep, Golden Bear Orientation, and Getting your Bearings. You will be assessed a fee of $380 on your first semester CalCentral bill. As orientation is mandatory for all new undergraduate students, so is the fee. If applicable, look to your financial aid package to see if this fee will be covered by financial aid in the form of the “New Student Grant.” If you have financial concerns related to the New Student Programming Fee, please complete the New Student Needs Questionnaire.

The programming fee covers:

  • Golden Bear Advising and Golden Bear Prep pre-arrival modules Golden Bear Orientation programming (virtual programs in August 2020 and any future in-person programming).

  • Getting Your Bearings programming (virtual programs in fall 2020 and any future in-person programming).

  • Please refer to our Office of the Registrar Tuition & Fees page for more details on student fees.

For more information, visit https://orientation.berkeley.edu/policies/.

What are the University's top 3 expenses, and how have they changed over the past 10 years? What is driving that change?

UC Berkeley’s largest and most pressing expense is faculty and staff compensation, which grows almost every year due to the need to provide merit/cost of living increases and to ensure workforce competitiveness. Other major expenses include deferred maintenance and seismic corrections that are needed to improve the safety and quality of our campus buildings. As the oldest UC campus with the oldest infrastructure, these expenses are greater at Berkeley than at other UCs.

With the majority of staff working from home, what operational cost can be cut?

UC Berkeley’s most significant cost comes in the form of employee compensation, in terms of both faculty salaries to support instruction/research and staff salaries to provide operational support for the campus. Therefore, operating costs, which are largely constituted by the compensation of the staff who provide this support, do not go away because the campus is currently working remotely. Moreover, in some instances, operating costs are actually increasing due to remote operations (e.g., the need for more technology) and the direct impact of COVID-19 (e.g., facilities cleaning, virus testing). Also, in order to preserve as many jobs as possible, Berkeley is working to redirect staff whose workload may be reduced by a closed campus into areas where workload has increased due to the virus.

Why aren’t essential workers receiving a merit increase?

Why aren’t essential workers receiving a merit increase such as facilities services staff? Every time the campus shuts down for reasons being the fires, the PG&E electricity shutdowns, now COVID shutdowns, facilities services have always been working and still manages to serve the campus community.

UCOP froze merit increases for career, non represented staff throughout the system. The campus cannot act in contradiction to that decision.  At the same time, represented staff previously negotiated collective bargaining agreements that include cost of living increases. We are asking managers to take note of extra work being assigned to any of their team members and do whatever is possible to support them. At the same time, many, perhaps most, of the thousands of staff who are now working from home are dealing with significant challenges and hardships. 

How will the budget deficit of $340 million impact staff who are working on visas, since employees working on visas have many rules to abide with.

First, after the mitigation steps we have taken, the deficit for the current fiscal year is projected to be approximately $65 million. This is a complex question.  Staff who work with students needing visas are supported through campus funds and we will take steps to ensure they can continue to fill this important function. With regard to visas that apply to visiting scholars and employees, there are two units involved: the Berkeley International Office (BIO) and Berkeley Regional Services (BRS). BIO is a recharge unit that will continue to provide its services.

Your BRS HR Business Partner, following the lead of BIO, will continue to help scholars seeking visas in collaboration with the BRS Visa Team and BIO.

Is UCB considering returning to the Central Shared Services model to save money and standardize work?

We are still using a shared services model. The campus adapted the model to move to regional service centers in the last couple years, and this still gives the economies of scale that we need to operate effectively.

In light of BLM and campus deficits, how will Cal's UCPD budget be affected? Student support programs are being cut left and right so I'm curious as to what has been prioritized in this year's budget.

This year’s UCPD budget has not been finalized yet. The decision-making process will take into account the diverse perspectives of the campus community, and will be guided by the Chancellor’s recent message about campus values and objectives regarding community safety.

Is there consideration in budget cut talks to substantially reduce funding to UCPD?

This year’s UCPD budget has not been finalized yet. The decision-making process will take into account the diverse perspectives of the campus community, and will be guided by the Chancellor’s recent message about campus values and objectives regarding community safety.

With deep budget issues why are we still paying for a militarized police force? Why has the University not offered substantial (e.g. 50%) cuts to UCPD for the next fiscal year with a planned pool timeline for complete dissolution of the UCPD?

This year’s UCPD budget has not been finalized yet. The decision-making process will take into account the diverse perspectives of the campus community, and will be guided by the Chancellor’s recent message about campus values and objectives regarding community safety.

How far would cutting UCPD funding go in helping to balance the budget and mitigating losses? How much of a priority is racial justice in the new budget? Will the administration commit to defunding UCPD?

This year’s UCPD budget has not been finalized yet. The decision-making process will take into account the diverse perspectives of the campus community, and will be guided by the Chancellor’s recent message about campus values and objectives regarding community safety.

If the UC budget is negatively impacted by the pandemic, why are we increasing our budget on UCPD?

This year’s UCPD budget has not been finalized yet. The decision-making process will take into account the diverse perspectives of the campus community, and will be guided by the Chancellor’s recent message about campus values and objectives regarding community safety.

Is the University looking at suspending the Cancel for Non-Payment Policy for the coming semester?

We understand that this policy can create confusion for some students. With this policy, students who don't pay the required 20% by the deadline may be temporarily dropped from their classes. Any students who are dropped can re-enroll the following day, but only after waitlists have been processed. Basically, students who are officially registered have priority to enroll in classes but all students can still enroll in classes.

For students who receive financial aid, and the majority of our students do, their aid will cover their minimum tuition payment, so we do not anticipate they will be at risk. These students also receive a corresponding exception status in CalCentral to ensure they can enroll in their classes.

The CNP policy is intended to support students in addressing their administrative responsibilities before the term begins so that they can focus on their academic responsibilities. It also finalizes course enrollments early in the semester.

Additionally, CNP ensures students have access to essential campus resources and other support services from the very first day of instruction.

Some students are confused about the short-term emergency loans. These loans are interest-free. Eligible undergraduate and graduate students can receive a co-payable loan the same day they apply; exceptional requests may take up to two business days. With these interest free loans, students can pay at least 20% of their tuition and fees.

During this pandemic, CNP is as important than ever. With some students considering taking the term off, they may neglect to drop their classes. The CNP policy will temporarily drop them from those classes, freeing up seats for students who are actually planning to enroll this term. Our goal is to ensure students have access to the classes they need.

https://registrar.berkeley.edu/registration/cancellation-withdrawal/cnp

Former generations of students who voted on campus fees were not impacted by the current COVID situation / crisis.

Former generations of students who voted on campus fees were not impacted by the current COVID situation / crisis. The school should recognize this and "go beyond itself" to demonstrate compassion for current students who are impacted by the current situation. The fact that former generations of students voted to enact fees in a different non-COVID universe fails to recognize how current students are impacted, and shifts the burden of caring for students away from leadership.

Tuition and mandatory fees are set by the University of California Office of the President for all UC campuses. Tuition and mandatory fees have been set regardless of the method of instruction and will not be refunded in the event instruction occurs remotely for any part of the Academic Year. Mandatory university charges for tuition and student services continue to help cover ongoing operations such as the delivery of instruction and the cost of student services such as registration, financial aid, and remote academic advising. Our teaching continues, even as its method of delivery has changed. Students are connecting with and learning from world-class faculty, completing coursework, earning full course credit, and making progress toward an immensely valuable UC Berkeley degree. UC Berkeley student services continue to be available to students via remote options including virtual study jams, remote movie nights, “Coffee & Career” video chats, online fitness and art classes, and student-led programs and activities to ensure that the term remains a very powerful and enriching one for our students.

Some campus-based fees were established to support certain efforts like the Wellness Fee which is paying for many essential health services. Others were established to maintain the safety of buildings or other facilities when necessary for the health and safety of students - e.g., to address seismic deficiencies. Even as UC campuses such as ours have curtailed limited aspects of their operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the costs that campus-based fees are intended to cover continue.

As it currently stands, all student fees are being assessed regardless of the mode of instruction. This is a systemwide practice implemented by UCOP, and has been further clarified in an FAQ posted on the Student Affairs website. A breakdown of Berkeley’s “Campus Fee” can be found on the Office of the Registrar’s Tuition & Fees web page.

UC Berkeley is not able to offer in-state tuition for nonresidents. The difference in tuition for residents versus nonresidents is a reflection of the significant investment by California taxpayers in the University of California system.

I am an International student and I have to pay a lot of fees related to that. I feel that it is unfair that we have to pay for transportation and gym fees when we don't use it or the service is not offered.

I am an International student and I have to pay a lot of fees related to that. I feel that it is unfair that we have to pay for transportation and gym fees when we don't use it or the service is not offered. Is there any way that the campus can adjust this?

Tuition and mandatory fees are set by the University of California Office of the President for all UC campuses. Tuition and mandatory fees have been set regardless of the method of instruction and will not be refunded in the event instruction occurs remotely for any part of the Academic Year. Mandatory university charges for tuition and student services continue to help cover ongoing operations such as the delivery of instruction and the cost of student services such as registration, financial aid, and remote academic advising. Our teaching continues, even as its method of delivery has changed. Students are connecting with and learning from world-class faculty, completing coursework, earning full course credit, and making progress toward an immensely valuable UC Berkeley degree. UC Berkeley student services continue to be available to students via remote options including virtual study jams, remote movie nights, “Coffee & Career” video chats, online fitness and art classes, and student-led programs and activities to ensure that the term remains a very powerful and enriching one for our students.

Some campus-based fees were established to support certain efforts like the Wellness Fee which is paying for many essential health services. Others were established to maintain the safety of buildings or other facilities when necessary for the health and safety of students - e.g., to address seismic deficiencies. Even as UC campuses such as ours have curtailed limited aspects of their operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the costs that campus-based fees are intended to cover continue.

UC Berkeley is not able to offer in-state tuition for nonresidents. The difference in tuition for residents versus nonresidents is a reflection of the significant investment by California taxpayers in the University of California system.

Idea for fairness - Transit fees like for buses not needed for remote learning can be *optional.* There was an increase in transit fees. This seems illogical.

The transit fee is a student referendum voted on by the students. The reason for the increase in the fee is the students wanted additional service, a new bus line. They included the new bus line in the referendum and it passed when the students voted. It was not a campus decision, it was a student request.

As it currently stands, all student fees are being assessed regardless of the mode of instruction. This is a systemwide practice implemented by UCOP, and has been further clarified in an FAQ posted on the Student Affairs website.

We do not see the Class Pass Fee to be a usage fee that should not be assessed now, during remote instruction. Like many of our campus fees, this particular fee is funding an initiative that relies on stable multi-year revenue as per our agreement with AC Transit. We will continue to assess these fees as originally planned.

How can UCB justify mandating this fee when it is so concerned about maintaining public safety and student health and safety in all other areas?

Current common wisdom and guidance from the State and County suggest people should minimize use of public transportation as much as possible, but the school is still trying to impose a $95 transit fee for public transportation. Students will be remote in the Fall and even if they are able to be on campus for a short amount of time may not feel safe using public transportation. How can UCB justify mandating this fee when it is so concerned about maintaining public safety and student health and safety in all other areas?

The transit fee is a student referendum voted on by the students. The reason for the increase in the fee is the students wanted additional service, a new bus line. They included the new bus line in the referendum and it passed when the students voted. It was not a campus decision, it was a student request.

As it currently stands, all student fees are being assessed regardless of the mode of instruction. This is a systemwide practice implemented by UCOP, and has been further clarified in an FAQ posted on the Student Affairs website.

We do not see the Class Pass Fee to be a usage fee that should not be assessed now, during remote instruction. Like many of our campus fees, this particular fee is funding an initiative that relies on stable multi-year revenue as per our agreement with AC Transit. We will continue to assess these fees as originally planned.

No mention of graduate students thus far, are they not part of your broader picture? Do graduate students factor into decision making at UC Berkeley?

Graduate students form an important part of University Life. Whether in their programs or departments, or via Graduate Division town halls, or the scheduling of an appointment during office hours with Dean Lisa Garcia Bedolla, feedback and requests from graduate students help us to better serve the needs of our graduate students.

Will work-study be transferred into loans since positions at places like the libraries won’t be open for work-study?

There are a number of work-study positions that may offer remote work accommodations. The Work-Study Program office is working diligently to recruit additional work-study employers and inform existing employers that they may consider engaging work-study students in remote work. Consistent with standard practice in other years, if students do not accept the work-study offered in their financial aid package before the start of the term, it will automatically be converted into loan so the funding is available in form they can access right away, if needed. Students may request that the offered loan be converted back to work-study later on in the academic year when they identify a work-study opportunity. To learn more about work-study and how to get the most out of the program, please review the Work-Study Information for Students and Work-Study Frequently Asked Questions pages.

Currently, neither FAFSA nor Cal itself takes rent cost into account when determining financial aid. What can you do to take families’ rent costs into account so that this doesn’t happen?

Currently, neither FAFSA nor Cal itself takes rent cost into account when determining financial aid. For students living in the Bay Area, New York, and other high-rent areas, this can make the financial aid calculations inaccurate and result in families having to pay larger sums than they can afford. This is exacerbated year to year when those families need to work harder to increase their salary to keep up with rent but backfires when they report that increase in earnings to FAFSA. What can you do to take families’ rent costs into account so that this doesn’t happen?

Please allow us to correct an erroneous assumption in your question. Financial aid packages are based on the Estimated Total Cost of Attendance, which includes rent, food, transportation, personal expenses, and books and supplies in addition to tuition and fees. Off-campus rent amounts are based on actual rent costs that UC Berkeley students report in the periodic Undergraduate Cost of Attendance Survey conducted by the UC Office of the President. These costs are adjusted for inflation yearly. Should the standard allocation not match the actual living expenses students experience, they may request a Cost of Attendance Adjustment.

Will meeting students' needs when it comes to aid for, e.g., off-campus living, be affected by this deficit?

No. The student aid budget is separate from the campus operating budget.

Why are students still being charged a “campus fee” when the campus is closed? If this fee is being using for other purposes, shouldn’t the name change?

We use the term “campus fee” to describe a set of fees that are only charged at the UC Berkeley campus. Campus fees are distinct from “system-wide fees” such as tuition and the Student Services Fee, which are charged at the same rate to all students in the UC system and are set by the UC Office of the President and the UC Regents.

Campus fee referenda are approved by a vote of the student body, and the fees cannot be used for purposes outside the original referenda language. Some were established to support certain efforts like the Wellness Fee which is paying for many essential health services. Others were established to maintain the safety of buildings or other facilities when necessary for the health and safety of students - e.g., to address seismic deficiencies. Even as UC campuses such as ours have curtailed limited aspects of their operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the costs that campus-based fees are intended to cover continue.

As it currently stands, all student fees are being assessed regardless of the mode of instruction. This is a systemwide practice implemented by UCOP, and has been further clarified in an FAQ posted on the Student Affairs website. A breakdown of Berkeley’s “Campus Fee” can be found on the Office of the Registrar’s Tuition & Fees web page.

Will the cost of attendance be adjusted for the lesser value remote learning we will be experiencing in the 2020-2021 school year?

Tuition and mandatory fees are set by the University of California Office of the President for all UC campuses. Tuition and mandatory fees have been set regardless of the method of instruction and will not be refunded in the event instruction occurs remotely for any part of the Academic Year. Mandatory university charges for tuition and student services continue to help cover ongoing operations such as the delivery of instruction and the cost of student services such as registration, financial aid, and remote academic advising. Our teaching continues, even as its method of delivery has changed. Students are connecting with and learning from world-class faculty, completing coursework, earning full course credit, and making progress toward an immensely valuable UC Berkeley degree. UC Berkeley student services continue to be available to students via remote options including virtual study jams, remote movie nights, “Coffee & Career” video chats, online fitness and art classes, and student-led programs and activities to ensure that the term remains a very powerful and enriching one for our students.

Some campus-based fees were established to support certain efforts like the Wellness Fee which is paying for many essential health services. Others were established to maintain the safety of buildings or other facilities when necessary for the health and safety of students - e.g., to address seismic deficiencies. Even as UC campuses such as ours have curtailed limited aspects of their operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the costs that campus-based fees are intended to cover continue.

UC Berkeley is not able to offer in-state tuition for nonresidents. The difference in tuition for residents versus nonresidents is a reflection of the significant investment by California taxpayers in the University of California system.

What is the university doing to facilitate childcare for Cal employees and the wider campus community?

What is the university doing to facilitate childcare for Cal employees and the wider campus community? We cannot effectively do our jobs if we have to take care of children throughout the day. Are University backed youth programs a priority for the campus?

We have created a new central website called “Caring for Families” (family.berkeley.edu). This site is a clearinghouse for all dependent care information; it points users to resources available to them (according to whether they are students, staff, or faculty). It will also have Covid-related updates. The site will also feature a new web-based tool that is under development, to help members of the campus community find others with whom to trade or share care. This tool is called “Berkeley Care Bubbles.”

How will the campus budget affect this fall semester and the spring 2021 semester? What if spring 2021 is fully online?

COVID-19 affects the campus budget in three major ways:

  1. Lost revenue in auxiliary operations (e.g., Athletics, Housing & Dining, CalPerformances) due to remote operations
  2. Increased costs required to deal with the virus (e.g., for remote instruction and operations, cleaning, virus testing)
  3. Lost funding due to the economic downturn caused by the pandemic (e.g., reduced state funding)

If the campus is fully online in the spring, the lost auxiliary revenue, in particular, will see the greatest negative impact.

Is there going to be a reduction in the number of GSIs being hired for Fall 2020? If so, how are PhD students who rely on GSI positions for funding themselves through grad school to proceed ahead?

We can’t predict whether departments will hire fewer GSIs overall since those factors are influenced by enrollment and other factors. Students who are concerned they may not get an appointment in their own department can review this Expected Jobs Opportunities list.

What are the University's top 3 expenses, and how have they changed over the past 10 years? What is driving that change?

Berkeley’s largest and most pressing expense is faculty and staff compensation, which grows almost every year due to the need to provide merit/cost of living increases and to ensure workforce competitiveness. Other major expenses include deferred maintenance and seismic corrections that are needed to improve the safety and quality of our campus building. As the oldest UC campus with the oldest infrastructure, these expenses are greater at Berkeley than at other UCs.

What does a budget cut mean for VCRO museums with an already tight budget, like the Botanical Garden, in terms of the amount they will be given and job security?

Unfortunately, this year’s budget cuts will be painful. The VCRO will consider a unit’s ability to cushion these cuts with available reserves and will also be expecting units to spend some of their “rainy day” funds to maintain their essential programs and personnel. We are aware that the museums, as well as the Botanical Garden and field stations are unique campus resources, and we are committed to keeping them viable through the current budget emergency.

Why do we budget a total of $30M for "testing & health services" over two years in the expense projections, a service that is currently free through the City of Berkeley for all residents and also covered by Health Insurance?

Why do we budget a total of $30M for "testing & health services" over two years in the expense projections, a service that is currently free through the City of Berkeley for all residents and also covered by Health Insurance? The IGI testing facility could bill the medical system for reimbursement; currently, most tests are done for populations not affiliated with UC at all (like power plant workers or prison inmates). It is not clear to me why we should cut established, successful educational projects in line with our core mission to fund free healthcare services, particularly if they benefit populations not even remotely affiliated with UC. Arguably, other societal institutions are better equipped and funded to handle testing costs. The government has agreed to reimburse all testing and this path - together with philanthropy- needs to be exhausted before we cut into funds needed for faculty recruitment, retention, and needed for the long-term success of the university.

Like most cities and counties, the City of Berkeley has found that, while it can offer testing to everyone, turnaround can be slow. The city estimates a turnaround of 6-8 days, which is too long to be very useful. UC Berkeley was able to mobilize quickly and start a testing lab during the early weeks of Shelter in Place, and has had enough capacity to assist the city in its testing, achieving a turnaround of a couple of days. For example, we test residents of some nursing homes and homeless shelters, as well as firefighters for the city. By testing our own staff and students, we relieve the city of the burden. Until cities have all the testing they need in a timely fashion, the Innovative Genomics Institute will continue to offer its services to the campus and community.

What percentage of tenured faculty will retire before the fall school year and what is the related financial savings?

Data is still preliminary. We have 20 retirements as of June 30, 2020, which is 1.33% of the faculty (this is a bit lower than usual). All were full Professors. Average salary of full Professors is $186,000; so, with benefits, these retirements represent savings of approximately $5,150,000.

Can we put pressure on the regents? I support pay cuts across the board rather than layoffs.

We are encouraging UCOP to move as quickly as possible to implement an equitable furlough program to minimize the need to lay employees off. However, for those campus services that are not currently being provided, some degree of layoffs may still be required if employees cannot be reassigned.

I’m a new faculty member and I’m wondering how budget cuts could impact new faculty.

The effects on new faculty would be no different than on veteran faculty. We will honor startup packages. We ran a bridge grant program that will allocate around $600,000 in response to requests from Assistant Professors whose research was affected by the curtailment of campus activity in the spring.
https://apo.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/bridging_grant_program_for_...

The pandemic has a disparate impact on those who have lower incomes. Will the Senior Management Group be asked to take a larger time (pay) reduction compared to other non-represented staff?

The furlough program under consideration by UCOP would be tiered so that those with higher incomes would have to take higher numbers of furlough days (and, as a result, have a larger reduction in compensation).

Can you commit that any pay reduction (whatever it's called) will not affect the compensation used to calculate our 3-year highest average compensation figure used for determining pension?

This is not within UC Berkeley’s control, but rather the retirement system’s control. However, a reduction in time does not affect the salary calculation for retirement purposes. It does, however, affect service time accruals.

Why is Cal not implementing the tiered percentage salary cuts for everyone on campus as was previously suggested by some campus leadership?

The campus cannot take this step on its own. UCOP must implement such a furlough program and it has indicated that it is developing a plan that might be ready for in depth discussion in the Fall.

How will UC Berkeley leadership shift the financial burden of cuts, reduction in time, pay, etc. to staff who have the willingness and/or capacity to weather such cutbacks, so we can support our most vulnerable employees?

Voluntary reductions in time and voluntary separations can and will be used as one way to give people who are in a position to reduce their income the opportunity to do so.

Has a 37 1/2 hour work week been considered?

Yes, this type of reduction in time is also under consideration.

Will UC Berkeley consider temporary salary reductions for people who earn above a certain threshold in order to safeguard the jobs of more vulnerable workers?

UC Berkeley is considering all options to address the budget shortfall, including reductions in time for employees.

Can voluntary salary reductions also be done on a temporary basis? With a freeze on merit increases etc, when can one expect to have salary level restored, if at all?

A voluntary action can be revoked at any time. We do not know when UCOP will take further action on merit increases.

What time frame is meant by the term "temporary" for work reassignment, layoffs, time reduction?

What time frame is meant by the term "temporary" for work reassignment, layoffs, time reduction (e.g., X months? years?); how will that length of time be decided; and what is expected to happen after that period (e.g., back to previous level, re-evaluation with potentially another temporary period, or changed to permanent).

Temporary layoffs can be, generally speaking, up to 4 months with the length of time varying in accordance with the applicable collective bargaining agreement or policy. The length of a temporary layoff will be determined according to business need. Prior to the end of a temporary layoff, the business unit will evaluate next steps, including whether a temporary layoff will be made indefinite or possibly extended if the applicable collective bargaining agreement or policy permits it. Reassignments will be made depending on business needs.

What commitments have the unions made to cut salary and merit pay costs? They need to (reduce) pay their fair share.

UCOP, which handles all contractual interactions with organized labor, has been negotiating with the unions on this issue.

Can campus send a survey out to staff to find out the areas to which workloads have increased with no compensation?

Over my 20 plus years at campus, I have seen the staff consistently take on more work, when employees leave, retire, or vacate positions, and we have not been compensated for the additional work. Can campus send a survey out to staff to find out the areas to which workloads have increased with no compensation? It seems that there is a disconnect between the powers to be and staff when it comes to workload. The union has been trying to negotiate this issue for years to no avail.

We are continuously working to set realistic expectations for managers and the campus as a whole, with the message being less people means less work. We rely on managers to work with their teams to understand and agree on what work can and cannot be done given our reduced capacity, which is not the same across all business units.